• Student writing on a stage in empty theatre
  • Students in rehearsed reading performance of Writers' final works
  • Dr. Stephen Sewell giving a pre-performance address

Master of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance)

Applications for 2023 are closed.

If you require assistance, please contact applications@nida.edu.au.

Master of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance) 2023 Course Updates.

View the MFA (Writing for Performance) Application Guide.

Not ready to apply? Sign up to our Higher Education list to receive updates about information sessions, how to complete your application and more.

NIDA encourages applications from candidates from diverse backgrounds, with different types of experiences across the various art forms, film, television or other areas, as well as in cultural development, policy and management.

NIDA welcomes Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander applicants.

About the course

The Master of Fine Arts in Writing for Performance is an industry-focused course designed to support and accelerate the careers of new writers telling compelling stories across stage and screen.

Students undergo a rigorous exploration of the building blocks of dramatic craft applied across theatre, film, television and interactive and immersive writing. This is a practice-based course that structures learning around imaginative writing exercises and the development of a portfolio of projects, including two full-length works and multiple outlines ready to pitch. Students also develop professional friendships and undertake collaborative projects, such as working in TV writers’ rooms, as well as working with directors and actors to workshop scenes and productions across stage and screen.

This is an intensive course with a significant workload designed to prepare students for life as a professional writer. However, it also offers flexibility and a safe, supportive and stimulating environment which students can be curious, experiment with form and subject matter, and explore their own unique imagination and voice. We believe that some of our most important stories are those least told and strongly encourage applications from First

Nations and other writers from underrepresented communities. Building inclusive and collaborative environments and understanding issues of story ownership is seen as core to developing an ethical practice.

The course is focused on developing versatile and adaptive dramatic writers capable of having sustainable writing careers. With the capacity to work across theatre, film and television, students receive a thorough overview of those industries, illustrated by industry guests, and how to generate opportunities to pitch themselves and their projects. NIDA’s strong links with industry facilitates pathways into those industries as well as allows students to begin establishing a network of professional connections.

This qualification is recognised in the Australian Qualifications Framework

The Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) is the national policy for regulated qualifications in Australian education and training.

Read more information about the AQF.

Course structure

The duration of the Master of Fine Arts is 15 months and comprises nine subjects with a total of 180 credit points, with a lead subject (60 credit points) which is the focal point.

Course duration and contact hours

Students are usually required NIDA from 9am to 6pm from Monday to Friday.

Additional time also needs to be allocated to library work, research, preparation for classes and private study. For this reason, it is difficult for NIDA students to maintain regular part-time jobs. Studying at NIDA is a big commitment, so students need to manage their time and resources carefully.

All Master of Fine Arts degrees, except for Cultural Leadership, are 15-month full-time courses

Course dates

To Be Confirmed

Overview

In brief
  • Develop a portfolio of industry focused work
  • Apply craft skills across multiple storytelling forms, including theatre, film, TV, dramatic podcasts and interactive
  • Explore a wide range of live and screened works
  • Collaborate with students across NIDA, including actors, directors and designers
  • Regular industry guests and opportunities
Delivery mode
  • Classes are face to face with some online

Principles of Dramatic Writing (25 credit points)

WFP9105 Principles of Dramatic Writing provides a thorough grounding in the foundational principles and strategies of dramatic writing. Students participate in writing and analysis exercises that explore areas such as conflict, character, structure, world building, scene writing and dialogue. The focus is on how these principles are applied similarly and differently across dramatic forms. To cement their understanding, students develop a short piece of dramatic writing, either for stage or screen, and develop a portfolio of scenes to demonstrate the depth of their understanding of these craft skills.

Writing for Stage (20 credit points)

WFP9106 Writing for Stage and Screen explores writing for live performance and how dramatic principles are applied to stage works. Learning is centred around the development a 10-minute play as well as an outline and character work for a full-length piece. Work will be developed in weekly roundtable readings and selected scenes workshopped in collaboration with actors.

Alongside their own writing, students will explore key movements in modern theatre through the weekly analysis and discussion of dramatic texts, live performance analysis and practical writing exercises. This work aims to introduce students to a range of theatrical techniques, dramatic composition of work and their connection to the social, political and cultural contexts in which they were created. Students expand their

creative practice with the introduction of improvisation and devising techniques, with the focus on discovery over design. This is realised through a devised collaboration with actors.

Finally, the subject explores the theatre and arts industry landscape, the economic pressures and various business models, the current and emerging trends and opportunities, the commissioning, development and production processes and the collaborative relationships involved. These will be underlined through a series of case studies and Q&A’s with artistic directors, playwrights, dramaturgs, literary managers and other guests.

Writing for Screen (20 credit points)

WFP9107 Writing for Screen explores visual storytelling and how dramatic principles are applied to writing for the screen. Students write a 10-minute short film script as well as a treatment for an original feature film. Work will be developed in weekly roundtables with students exploring the role of the script editor, writing coverage on colleagues’ work. Students learn about visual screen language through the viewing of short films and producing their own visual storytelling exercises. They will also delve into the production process by learning the basics of budgeting and scheduling their short film. As part of the subject, students have weekly analysis and discussion of scripts, reading works from key film movements and genres. Students will learn how dramatic composition and the techniques employed by writers connect to their social, political and cultural context and intentions.

Episodic Writing (20 credit Points)

In WFP9108 Episodic Writing students’ understanding of dramatic principles and visual storytelling are applied to episodic writing, with a focus on writing for television. Students explore different episodic structures, from serials to continuing stories, one-hour dramas, half-hour comedy and short form web-series. These principles are put into practice through the writing of their own spec episodes of an existing show plus an original series bible for an original hour-drama or half-hour comedy series. To prepare them, students will receive extensive training in working in writers’ rooms, as a writer and as a note taker. Students will observe professional writers working in a room as well as forming their own rooms to develop a new series of an existing show.

To support their own writing, students engage in weekly critical analysis and discussion of television texts, looking at current and emerging trends in television. Focus is put on the differences between writing for public, commercial or SVOD series. Students also receive masterclasses on writing for a range of different genres, including writing for children, writing animation and writing comedy.

As with previous subjects, students also explore the industry context for episodic, including economic drivers, commissioning trends, key creative and organisational roles and the collaborative nature of television. These will be unlined through a series of case studies and Q&A’s with television writers, showrunners and commissioners.

The Business of Writing (10 credit points)

In WFP9109 The Business of Writing students are introduced to the business of being a writer with the aim of translating storytelling ability into sustainable careers. This includes how to pitch themselves and their projects, how to identify and capitalise on opportunities, how to network and manage relationships, an

introduction to legal contracts, your rights as a writer, and how to manage your affairs as a self-employed creative. Through a series of Q&A’s it also discusses how to develop productive writing routines and habits as well as developing resilience and promoting metal health.

Students will develop pitches for industry guests, including agents, producers, artistic directors, development executives. They will be required to articulate their ideas in both written and verbal form, as well as defining the connection between themselves their work and to the world around them. In preparation for these pitches, students will be required to research the industry landscape and discuss strategies for submitting work to agents, producers and theatre companies. They will also be required to produce a professional biog, CV and writing sample for circulation after the meetings.

Interactive and Immersive Storytelling (10 credit points)

WFP9110 Interactive and Immersive Storytelling explores one of the major frontiers of storytelling at the boundary between technology, live performance and screen narrative. It takes a multi-disciplinary approach to the concepts and principles of interactive and immersive storytelling that can be applied to interactive theatre-making, immersive instillations, digital games, social media, podcasts and XR. As part of the subject, students are given the opportunity to experience a range of these mediums and their narrative design, as well as looking at the possibilities of multi-platform storytelling.

The subject expands beyond notions linear narrative by introducing a variety of other narrative structures and new concepts like emergence, environmental storytelling and the role of agency and meaningful choices. Particular attention is paid to storytelling through sound and the use of immersive soundscapes.

Major Project (30 credit points)

WFP9111 Major Project begins with a Story Lab where students generate, pitch, discuss and develop concepts for full-length plays, films, TV series or interactive and immersive projects. Students consider these new ideas alongside the play outline, film treatment and TV bible that they developed in their first year and choose two projects that are aligned to their career goals.

Students develop these full-length projects through a structured development process built around regular roundtable meetings where they work in small groups to read and provide development notes on each other’s work under the guidance and support of a project supervisor. These roundtables are supplemented by individual meetings and targeted mentoring. Students will also get the opportunity to workshop selected scenes with actors, directors and / or dramaturgs.

The subject culminates in a series of professional meetings, building on the work done in the Business of Writing subject, where students pitch their work and expand their networks

Admission criteria

Admission criteria

  • All applicants applying for a graduate course at NIDA must have completed an undergraduate degree (in any area) or have five years relevant experience in a related area.
  • Students must be proficient in written and spoken English, with international applicants required to have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of IELTS 8.0.  Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at http://www.ielts.org/

Essential requirements

We select applicants who demonstrate commitment, capacity and willingness to advance their practice by:

  1. Working creatively
  2. Collaborating as part of a creative team
  3. Demonstrating a range of relevant skills and technical abilities
  4. Providing evidence of intellectual enquiry and reflection within their work
  5. Communicating clearly
  • All applicants applying for the graduate courses at NIDA must have completed an undergraduate degree (in any area) or have at least five years relevant experience in a related area.
  • Students must be proficient in written and spoken English, with international applicants required to have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of IELTS 8.0.  Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org.

How to apply

Application process

Application to NIDA is by direct entry. Applicants apply online via the NIDA website.

Entry to the MFA (Writing for Performance) is by interview. See below for details on how to prepare.

View the MFA (Writing for Performance) Application Guide.

How to apply

NIDA uses direct application to the provider via the NIDA website.

Interview dates

Interview dates for the 2023 intake will be announced after applications open.

Your interview

What to prepare

SUBMIT WITH YOUR APPLICATION

The application process for the Bachelor of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance) consists of two rounds:

  • Round One – Online Application, including CV and Portfolio
  • Round Two – Interview.

Only applicants who are successful in Round One will be invited to interview.

The following should be uploaded with your application:

1.NARRATIVE STATEMENT

In a maximum of 1000 words, tell us your own unique story. Who are you, where do you come from and where are you heading to? Give us a sense of your personality, what has shaped you and what do you want to say about the world?

2.PROFESSIONAL CV

You should upload a detailed CV highlighting your education and training, professional work and other relevant information.

3. ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT

You will need to provide proof of your university degree/s or five years of professional experience in a relevant area. This can be a scan/photograph of your transcript or testamur from the awarding institution.

4. PORTFOLIO

You should prepare examples of past work that support your application and demonstrate your suitability for a career in writing for performance, for both stage and screen.

  • Prepare you three best pieces of writing.
  • At least two should be dramatic scripts (plays or screenplays) but one can be creative writing in another form (eg. A short story or poem).
  • At least one script should be a full piece of work while the other can be an extract of a larger work.
  • All three pieces of work should be professionally formatted.
  • Each extract or example should be no more than 2000 words.
  • Please merge your three pieces into one document, and upload as part of your application.

Your narrative statement, CV and your writing portfolio should be submitted with your application.

THINGS TO NOTE

NIDA recognises that interviews can be stressful, but every effort will be made to ensure your experience will be as relaxing and enjoyable as possible. Remember, the more time and effort you put into your application in advance, the better prepared you will be and the more you will benefit from the interview and discussion.

The interview process is friendly, informal and open, and is designed to give you the very best opportunity to indicate your potential and readiness to study at NIDA. However, should you have any concerns with the interview process or with what is said to you during the course of the interview, please express your concern immediately, or talk it over with a member of the interview panel before you leave.

What to expect on the day

Interviews are generally conducted by two NIDA staff members, and will take place via Zoom.

Interviews will run for approximately 40 minutes. The interview is in two parts:

  • First, there will be a brief talk about NIDA, the MFA (Writing for Performance) course and what will happen during the interview. There will be an opportunity for you to ask any questions you may have about NIDA or about the interview itself.
  • Each applicant will then be interviewed for around 30 minutes. During the interview, we will discuss your portfolio; your ideas about theatre, film and television; your worldview, concerns, ambitions, creative process experience, and why you want to study Writing for Performance at NIDA.

Interview tips

  • Preparation! The more time and effort you put into the project and interview preparation in advance, the more confident you’ll be and the more you will benefit from the interview and discussion.
  • Come with a clear idea of why you want to study Writing for Performance at NIDA.
  • Plan your journey to the interview. Give yourself plenty of travel time to allow for delays.
  • We know that interviews can be stressful, but every effort will be made to ensure your experience will be as interesting and enjoyable as possible. The interview is designed to give you the very best opportunity to show your potential and readiness to study at NIDA.

The Writing portfolio

Writing portfolio requirements

You should prepare examples of past work that support your application and demonstrate your suitability for a career in writing for performance, for both stage and screen.

  • Prepare you three best pieces of writing.
  • At least two should be dramatic scripts (plays or screenplays) but one can be creative writing in another form (eg. A short story or poem).
  • At least one script should be a full piece of work while the other can be an extract of a larger work.
  • All three pieces of work should be professionally formatted.
  • Each extract or example should be no more than 2000 words.
  • Please merge your three pieces into one document, and upload as part of your application.

Your narrative statement, CV and your writing portfolio should be submitted with your application.

Fees

Tuition fees (2023)

Domestic and international students are required to pay tuition fees by the due date each semester.

Domestic Students

Domestic students are Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents and New Zealand citizens.

Prospective students: Download the Domestic Graduate Student Fee Schedule 2023

International Students

Fees and financial assistance vary for international students see International Students for full details.

Domestic tuition fees overview

DegreeCourse duration2023 Annual tuition fee $AUD*Estimated course tuition fee*
Master of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance)15 monthsN/A$33,840.00

Domestic tuition fee details

2023
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
WFP9101Writing with Purpose600.418$11,280.00
WFP9102Rereading the World300.208$5,640.00
WFP9103The Radical Imagination150.104$2,820.00
WFP9104The Future is Now300.208$5,640.00
COM9101Contextualising Practice150.104$2,820.00
COM9102Generating Research Through Practice300.208$5,640.00
Total 1801.25$33,840.00


*The tuition fees are reviewed each year and you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolment.

** EFTSL – Effective Full-Time Study Load: indicates the relative study load of a subject against a full-time study load of 1.0 for an academic year. For consistency the EFTSL** have been rounded to 3 decimal places. This is not indicative of the full value of the EFTSL but represents an accurate load for fee calculations

Tuition fees (2022)

Domestic and international students are required to pay tuition fees by the due date each semester.

Domestic Students

Domestic students are Australian citizens, Australian permanent residents and New Zealand citizens.

Current students: Download the Domestic Graduate Student Fee Schedule 2022

International Students

Fees and financial assistance vary for international students see International Students for full details.

Domestic tuition fees overview

DegreeCourse duration2022 Annual tuition fee $AUD*Estimated course tuition fee*
Master of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance)15 monthsN/A$32,220.00

Domestic tuition fee details

2022
Subject codeSubjectCredit pointsEFTSL**Tuition fee*
WFP9101Writing with Purpose600.418$10,740.00
WFP9102Rereading the World300.208$5,370.00
WFP9103The Radical Imagination150.104$2,685.00
WFP9104The Future is Now300.208$5,370.00
COM9101Contextualising Practice150.104$2,685.00
COM9102Generating Research Through Practice300.208$5,370.00
Total 1801.25$32,220.00


*The tuition fees are reviewed each year and you are liable for the additional tuition costs if the tuition fees rise during the course of your enrolment.

** EFTSL - Effective Fulltime Study Load: indicates the relative study load of a subject against a full time study load of 1.0 for academic year.

Additional costs

Information Technology Recommendations

To access NIDA wireless (iWIRE) network, students are required to have access to a Laptop (Windows 7 and later), Macbook (Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard or later) or a Tablet (less than three years old with wireless facility). All the devices should comply with 802.11a/b/g/n WPA-Enterprise security. All notebooks should be secured with a Kensington lock to help prevent theft.

For file transfers and data backup, a 500GB hard drive or higher and an 8GB USB stick are also recommended, as is a DVD burner, for optimum visual graphics on your computer(Laptop/MacBook/Desktop etc.) a 1GB dedicated graphics card is recommended but not required. 

FEE-HELP

Australian citizens and holders of permanent humanitarian visas are eligible for an Australian Government FEE-HELP loan for all or part of their tuition fees. For more information about FEE-HELP please read the information below and visit Study Assist.

FEE-HELP is the Australian Government loan scheme that assists eligible students to pay their tuition fees, so that students do not have to pay tuition fees up-front. FEE-HELP can cover all or part of a student's tuition fees. In 2019, the FEE-HELP limit is $104,440 for most students.

The government pays the amount of the loan directly to NIDA. Students repay their loan through the tax system once their incomes rises above the minimum threshold for compulsory repayment.

For more information go to studyassist.gov.au

Who is eligible for FEE-HELP?

You are eligible for a FEE-HELP loan if you are either:

  • an Australian Citizen; or
  • hold a permanent humanitarian visa.

The following students are NOT eligible for FEE-HELP:

  • New Zealand citizens - refer to the Study Assist website
  • Australian permanent residents
  • Overseas students.

NIDA FAQs

Entry requirements FAQs

Entry requirements for each course are available under the ‘Interviews and how to apply’ tab on individual course pages.

Is there a maximum age restriction for students?

There is no maximum age restriction for any NIDA undergraduate or graduate course.

Application FAQs

How do I apply for a full-time course at NIDA?

The first step is to fill in an application form, available online from June 2021. You must then prepare for your audition or interview, the details of which can be found on the course pages.

Can I apply for more than one course?

Yes, however a separate online application form will be required for each course you would like to apply for.

My application form isn’t working/loading!

Online applications are open from June annually.

If you are having difficulty using the online application form, check your internet browser: Internet Explorer, Firefox and Safari are the recommended browsers. You should also turn off any security that blocks pop-ups, as this may prevent the application screen from opening.

What do I do if I haven’t received details of my interview?

Once you have submitted your application and paid your application fee you will be emailed a receipt as well as further details regarding preparation for your audition/ interview. If you do not receive any emails from NIDA please check your junk/ spam filter or promotions filter (Gmail). If you are still experiencing difficulties please contact us at: applications@nida.edu.au

Interview FAQs

What do I need to prepare for my interview?

All the details for interview requirements can be found on the individual course pages under the ‘Interviews and how to apply’ tab.

Does NIDA give audition/ interview feedback?

Due to the large number of people being auditioned/ interviewed, it is not possible for NIDA to provide individual feedback, either orally or in writing. However, the audition/ interview are learning experiences, particularly through the opportunity in the auditions to observe the presentation of audition pieces by other applicants and any redirection suggestions provided to you or other applicants by members of the audition panel.

Where will my interview take place?

Interview conditions will depend on your course. They may be in-person or over Zoom, in which case a Zoom link will be provided to you prior to your interview.

What happens after my interview?

Final selections are made for each course by mid-December when study offers will be distributed to successful applicants via email.

Please note applicants who do not make it through to the recall stage for Bachelor of Fine Arts (Acting) and Master of Fine Arts (Directing) courses have not been successful for the 2022 intake.

Studying at NIDA FAQs

How are NIDA’s courses structured?

NIDA offers a conservatoire based method of education and training based around intensive practice-based learning.

There is formal class work, practical instruction, lectures and, for some courses, periods of placements in the arts industry. Each course has dedicated time to discipline-specific immersion, as well as common subjects undertaken by students of all disciplines.

NIDA Play Productions and screen work provides practical learning experiences, giving students the opportunity to apply learnt technical skills. Play productions are an important part of NIDA’s higher education courses with usually five productions being produced each semester.

More detailed information about course structure can be found on the individual course pages. 

What facilities does NIDA offer?

NIDA’s award winning campus includes a range of facilities available to students:

  • the Parade Theatre, seating over 700 people, is equipped with advanced technology in sound, lighting and scenery
  • performance spaces of varying sizes. The Parade Studio, Parade Playhouse, Parade Space and Atrium are also utilised for productions
  • the state-of-the-art Reg Grundy Studio is used for film and television recording
  • the Rodney Seaborn Library, specialising in the performing arts
  • computer-aided design (CAD) and multimedia studios
  • rehearsal rooms, teaching spaces and music practice rooms
  • and workshops for the manufacture of scenery, properties and costumes.

Does NIDA offer credit transfer for study undertaken elsewhere?

Yes, NIDA grants credit for formal study undertaken in recognised higher institutions in Australia, including universities, colleges, TAFE and other post-secondary education institutions and for study at recognised overseas institutions, where the applicant has met the learning outcomes, attained the knowledge and/or developed the skills relevant to a specific subject. An application for credit must be submitted and approved prior to commencement of the course. For further information see NIDA’s credit transfer policy.

Accommodation

NIDA does not have on-campus accommodation for students. NIDA has a close relationship with the University of New South Wales (UNSW) which is located opposite NIDA. UNSW offers a range of housing options which NIDA students can access. For more details see UNSW Residential Communities

New and returning students can also access the NIDA student noticeboards and webpages to advertise or seek accommodation and many liaise via email and Facebook to arrange housing together.

Students are responsible for arranging their own accommodation.

Cost of living 

Students relocating to Sydney should consider evening transportation when choosing accommodation. Students working on productions are often required to stay as late as 11pm or 12pm and need to consider safe ways to get home in the evenings. For this reason many students choose accommodation options close to NIDA.

Consider that the costs of living in Sydney may be different to your home location. 

We estimate that you need approximately AUD$20,000 to cover living expenses in Sydney for each year of study. In addition, we recommend that you have at least AUD$2000 when you arrive to cover the initial costs of books, rental bond, and furniture.

These figures do not include large household items (such as a refrigerator) or a car. We recommend that you use public transport, as owning a car can be expensive and there is very limited parking near NIDA.

NIDA Student policies FAQs

Can I defer my studies at NIDA?

Due to the highly competitive nature of NIDA’s admissions process, you must enrol for the year for which you have been offered a place. You cannot defer acceptance of a place. If you want to enrol in a subsequent year, you will need to apply again the following year and go through the interview process again. There is no guarantee that you will be offered a place next time.

Application for leave of absence by continuing students must be made in writing with reasons to the Head of Course for consideration and recommendation to the Director/CEO. Approval for leave of absence can only be granted by the Director/CEO and only under exceptional circumstances.

Can students be suspended from NIDA?

In addition to cancellation of enrolment for non-payment of tuition fees, a student’s enrolment at NIDA can be suspended or cancelled on the grounds of misconduct.

See NIDA student policies for more information. 

Fees FAQs

What are the tuition fees for accredited courses?

Full information about tuition fees and FEE-HELP is available under the ‘Fees’ tab on individual course pages. 

Financial assistance FAQs

Are there scholarships available for studying at NIDA?

NIDA is pleased that through the generosity of the Luminis Foundation, we are able to offer the Luminis Foundation Indigenous Fellowship in Cultural Leadership at annual intake. This Fellowship will support the successful applicant by funding 50% of their Master of Fine Arts (Cultural Leadership only) course fee.

NIDA does not offer other scholarships that cover the cost of tuition fees.

NIDA students, who are Australian citizens, are able to access FEE-HELP loans for assistance with their tuition fees. For more information on FEE-HELP loans see www.studyassist.gov.au or the ‘Fees’ tab on individual course pages.

Is financial assistance available for Master of Fine Arts students?

The Master of Fine Arts courses are not approved courses for students to receive Austudy, Youth Allowance (student) and Pensioner Education Supplement through Centrelink. Master of Fine Arts students enrolled in a full-time course are eligible to apply for a NIDA scholarship.

NIDA offers full-time students the opportunity to apply for financial assistance (scholarships) at the beginning of each year to assist with living costs. The bursaries are made available through the generosity of donors to NIDA and from bequests. Bursaries are paid on a fortnightly basis during the NIDA year, with the value of individual bursaries in 2019 ranging from $1,600 annually to $4,000 annually, depending on need and the year and course of study. Bursaries are only available to students currently enrolled at NIDA in full-time courses.

NZ and international students FAQs

Is there a limit on the number of international students accepted each year?

NIDA welcomes applications from international students. While there is no quota for international students, there are limited numbers of students in each course.

What are the English language requirements for international students?

Students must be proficient in written and spoken English, with international applicants required to have an English language proficiency equivalent to an overall band score of IELTS 8.0 for Acting, Directing and Writing for Performance, or IELTS 7.0 for other higher education courses. Information on IELTS and testing centres in your country is available at www.ielts.org.

International applicants who are short-listed for the Acting course after the recall audition must provide evidence of their English language capability by the end of the first week in December in order to be considered in the final selection process. International applications for other courses should bring evidence of their English language capability to their interview.

Where can I find more information about international students at NIDA?

More information about studying as an international student at NIDA can be found at International students

Careers

Our graduates may be employed writers for stage and screen, as well as other dramatic genres, including dramatic podcasts and interactive storytelling. Students will be equipped with the knowledge and skills to access and navigate a rapidly changing industry landscape and practices.

POTENTIAL CAREERS
  • Playwright
  • Screenwriter
  • Dramaturg
  • Script Editor/developer
  • Narrative designer
  • And other forms of writing for performance

See NIDA's list of Alumni.

Course Accreditation

NIDA’S Registration Status

Registered as a Higher Education Provider by TEQSA
https://www.teqsa.gov.au/national-register/provider/national-institute-dramatic-art

Registration Renewal Date

25 June 2025

NIDA

CRICOS Registration

Code: 00756M

This allows NIDA to enrol international students on student visas into CRICOS approved courses.

Self Accrediting Authority*

Yes – partial self accrediting

Registered Higher Education providers may be authorised by TEQSA to self-accredit courses of study.

Course nameStatusCRICOS Code

Master of Fine Arts (Writing for Performance)

Self-Accredited by NIDA under TEQSA’s determination
of Self Accrediting Authority for NIDA

N/A for 2023

RPL/ Credit Transfer

Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) / Credit Transfer

Recognition of Prior Learning is an assessment process that involves assessment of an individual’s relevant prior learning (including formal, informal and non-formal learning) to determine the credit outcomes of an individual application for credit.

NIDA may grant credit for:

  • Formal study undertaken in recognised education institutions in Australia, including universities, colleges, TAFE and other post-secondary education institutions and for study at recognised overseas institutions.
  • Credentialed courses provided by recognised professional bodies, employers and other authorities, where appropriate certification is available; and
  • Prior learning, where such learning can be sufficiently evidenced.

The principles underlying the assessment of credit transfer/Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) applications are that the policy and procedures are:

  1. Aligned to the Higher Education Standards Framework and the Vocational Standards for RTOs.
  2. Designed to maintain the integrity and reputation of NIDA’s accredited courses for which credit or RPL is applied and support the collaborative nature of NIDA’s conservatoire training model.
  3. Consistent, equitable, transparent, and accountable.
  4. Based on processes of comparable standard and integrity to those used to assess the relevant subject.
  5. That students are not disadvantaged in achieving the expected learning outcomes for the course of study or qualification.

NIDA Recognition of Prior Learning Policy

Apply for a Credit Transfer and/or RPL

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